Look Out for Credit Cards that Are “Yours” but Aren’t With You

Recently I got an automated email from Citibank letting me know that my credit card “statement is ready to view.” It was not spam and contained the email security zone, which states my name, the last 5 digits of my account, and since when I’ve had the card. The problem? I don’t have a card with those last 5 digits.

I called Citibank to check whether there was a glitch in their automated system, but the customer service representative (CSR) confirmed that there was in fact a card open in my name with those last 5 digits. Luckily, there were no charges to it, but apparently it had been open for a year now. I asked for him to securely close that account, and, since I already had him on the phone, asked to make sure that there were only 2 cards to my Citibank account – the two cards I actually own. He found those and two more. There were three cards to my name that I never actually had!

None of the three cards had any charges to them, but because I do not actually have any of them their very existence was enough to scare me. The CSR was able to securely close two of them but had to write out a manual close request for the third, so I will call in a couple of weeks to check up on that.

But this is what I’ve learned from this experience:

  • Read your credit card emails. Just because you get them every month doesn’t mean they are always the same. For some reason the card that triggered the notification had been open for a year but I never received any notification about it other than this one. Nonetheless, I opened and read through it because it came to a different email address than the one I use for my credit cards. Had it been sent to my other email, I might’ve never found out about it at all.
  • People worry about the impact that opening too many credit cards or closing a card might have on their credit score, but there’s something a lot worse: open credit cards that you don’t physically have. I am less worried about the ding on my score that the inquirer(s) may have caused by opening the card or the dent I may have made by closing all three cards at once than about the possibility that someone could’ve actually used the cards. I do not understand how the card application happened, and why someone would have a card on my name and not use it for a whole year, but I think I’m lucky. If any of the cards had been charged, my score and I would be in much bigger trouble.
  • Call your credit card company just to check what they have on file. You should definitely do that when you get a strange notification like I did, but I would recommend also calling every year or so just to make sure. Even though my “statement notification” email came from Citibank, I am calling Discover as well to verify that they really only have one card on file for me. You never know what you’ll find out – I only got the notification for one Citibank card, but once I had the representative on the line and asked him to check, he found 2 more.

I was lucky that nothing had been charged to any of the three cards I had never opened, and I hope that you are even luckier than I am and don’t have any fraudulent activity to your name at all. But with credit cards, better safe than sorry is the rule. Even if you think you’re lucky, it’s better to call and check than find out the hard way.

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