Double-Dipping at Starbucks

If you go to Starbucks once every two months or more, you should pick up a Starbucks gift card. And register it.

The Starbucks Rewards program is a hybrid between a store loyalty card and a store credit card. Just like a loyalty card, with each transaction, you accumulate points and make your way to earning more benefits. But similar to a store credit card, the benefits only accrue if you use the store card rather than your primary credit card to pay. In Starbucks’ case, however, there’s no need to give out your social security number and wait to get approved. Rather, to accumulate Stars (their version of points), all you have to do is pay for your drinks and food with a Starbucks gift card.

This is how the program works: first, you get yourself a Starbucks gift card. They come in several different styles and may even vary by city – any of them is fine. It can also even be the gift card that you receive when you redeem your credit card points. Then, you create an account in the Starbucks Rewards webpage and register that gift card. From that moment on, you will get one Star each time you make a purchase (no matter what you buy or how bill or small the bill) at Starbucks using that gift card. You can register as many gift cards as you want in your account.

The benefits increase with the number of Stars you get, and will be more or less meaningful to you depending on your drinking and loitering habits. Here are the benefits at each level, straight from the Starbucks Rewards website:

 

Starbucks Rewards Benefit Levels

 

It’s a little annoying that you need to reach 45 Stars to earn your first “free drink every 15 purchases”, but the good thing is that as long as you maintain your Gold status, you’ll keep earning this benefit. That is, provided that you make 30 purchases  at Starbucks every 12 months, you’ll continue getting a free drink every 15 purchases – you don’t have to go 2 rounds of 15 without earning anything again.

To Double-Dip

Now, because Starbucks Rewards requires that you use their gift card to pay for your purchases in order to earn Stars, it may seem like you’re giving up on earning whatever points or cash back you earn through your credit card – but you don’t have to. This is the perfect double-dipping opportunity: a Starbucks gift card can be re-loaded as many times as you want, so why not re-load it using your preferred credit card?

Suppose you go to Starbucks twice a week. Next time, rather than paying for your order on your credit card, you can pick up a Starbucks gift card right on the counter and use your credit card to load it with, say $20. Then use that to pay for your order and all your subsequent orders until the balance runs low again. Then just use your credit card again to re-load it. This way you earn your credit card points (loading a gift card will show up in your credit card statement just like a purchase and earn you the points or cash back accordingly) AND accumulate Stars.

If you have the CitiForward card, for example, this method will earn you 5 ThankYou points whenever you re-load the Starbucks card and a Star each time you actually use it. The Starbucks Rewards webpage even allows you to set up for auto-reload if you so prefer.

If you have a credit card with 5% cash back categories that rotate every quarter, this approach allows you to stretch that benefit even further. For instance, from July to September 2012, the Chase Freedom card is giving 5% cash back on gas station and restaurant purchases. Since Starbucks counts as a restaurant for that credit card, you could load your Starbucks gift card before September 30, 2012, with roughly what you would spend over the following couple of months. Then, even once October kicks in, you can continue paying for your drinks with your Starbucks gift card, essentially earning 5% cash back for drinks bought outside the 5% cash back window!

Also note that your Starbucks gift card can be used in various countries including Canada and the UK – even if purchased and loaded in the US – so no need to worry about foreign transaction fees or navigating local currencies just to get a cup of coffee. And you still get a Star.

Movie Night Tomorrow with Visa and Fandango

If you are a Visa Signature credit card holder, you may want to make tomorrow a movie night. Throughout the summer Visa has been running a Friday 2-for-1 deal with Fandango, whereby its Signature members who buy two or more tickets for the same show through this link get one of them free. This deal is only valid for same-day purchases on Fridays, and tomorrow August 17th is the last day.

Several cards under the Visa brand are Visa Signature cards, including the Chase Sapphire, a United Airlines and an Alaska Airlines card, and even the Capital One Venture card. Just look in your wallet and if you find any card that says “Visa Signature” on it, it should qualify. If you’re still not sure, Visa/Fandango can let you know; before buying your ticket you are required to enter your credit card number and you should get a message saying whether it is a Signature card or not.

2-for-1 Movies from Visa and Fandango

As for the rest of the rules, the main catch is that in order to get the 2-for-1 deal you have to book through Fandango, incurring its convenience fee. However, the 2-for-1 does include the fee as well, so that at least you’ll only pay for half of it. And half a fee is likely cheaper than a whole other ticket. The discount covers up to $19.50 and is only valid once every 30 days, so you can get in on this deal tomorrow only if the last time you took advantage of it was Friday, July 13th or earlier.

If you have a Visa Signature card but are not planning on watching a movie tomorrow or have already used the deal in the last 30 days, you can still get a discount: Signature cardholders get $5 off each purchase of $25 “Fandango Bucks” through the same link. “Fandango Bucks” are essentially Fandango gift cards, which must be redeemed through fandango.com but can be used any day and do not expire. Visa Signature card holders can buy up to $100 worth of Fandango Bucks each month until October 31, 2012. If you frequently buy tickets through Fandango anyway – particularly if you catch movies on weekends when they are first released and may get sold out before you reach the theatre – this can be a nice discount.

If you’re looking for something to do tomorrow, a 2-for-1 deal on movie tickets just might do the trick. But if you’re enjoying the sun and it doesn’t seem like the right day to be indoors, you can still load up on some discounted “Fandango Bucks” and save them for a rainy day.

Secure Your Way into Having a Credit History

I recently met up with a friend of mine who started looking into buying a house, but has no credit history. ‘None at all?’ I asked? She moved to the US only a few years ago, so she never had the benefit of building her credit history as an authorized user for her parent’s credit cards. She doesn’t have US student loans, her utility bills are included in her rent, and her company pays her cell phone bill. She bought a used car and paid for it in cash.

Although it seems like a catch-22, where you need to have a credit history in order to get credit, there may be a few ways out. The most reliable one, which I suggested to her, is getting a secured credit card. Several banks and credit unions offer secured credit cards, which require customers to deposit a certain amount of money as collateral. This deposit, as long as it stays in the bank, generally becomes the credit card holder’s line of credit. Basically, this is a credit card that requires you give the maximum amount you’d like to be able to charge on it – your line of credit – up front. This way, you build your credit history by using it as any other credit card, receiving a statement and paying your balance every month, while the bank has access to your deposit in case you default on it.

Secured Credit Card (from Capital One)

If you decide to close your secured card, say, because you “graduated” into receiving offers and getting approved for an unsecured credit card, you get back the deposit you made for your credit line. There may be some fees, however, for maintaining a secured credit card that end up biting into your deposit, so it’s worth shopping around before settling on the right one.

Below is a sample of a few secured credit card offers out there, with a wide range of minimum deposits and fees.

  • BankAmericard Secured Credit Card ­­– the credit line for this secured credit card offered by Bank of America varies from $300 to $4,900 and is determined by the Bank according to your income and the minimum deposit you would like to make. Your deposit does not earn any interest (it is placed into a ‘Deposit Account’), but after 12 months you may be eligible to “graduate” into an unsecured card and get your deposit back. Annual fee: $39
  • USAA Secured Credit Card– the deposit you make for this card, which can be between $250 and $5,000, is placed in a 2-year Variable Rate CD. On one hand, this means your deposit is locked in for two years, but on the other, at a current annual yield of 0.74%, it has one of the highest CD returns out there. This secured card is available as an American Express and a MasterCard. Annual fee: $35
  • US Bank Secured Visa – you can make a deposit from $300 to $5,000 into a US Bank Savings account, which currently yields 0.05% per year. Your line of credit is written out for the same amount as your deposit, and US Bank reconsiders cardholders for an unsecured credit card after 12 months of good standing. Annual fee: $35
  • Wells Fargo Secured Visa – users can deposit $300-$10,000 for this card, all of which becomes the card’s line of credit. This deposit, however, does not earn any interest (it is placed into a ‘Collateral Account’) so if your goal is to establish credit it is probably best to deposit close to $300 and pay the balance off in full every month. You can deposit any extra money into a savings account or a product that yields at least some interest. Annual fee:$25
  • Capital One Secured MasterCard – this is technically a hybrid between a secured and unsecured credit card. The minimum security deposit ranges from $49 to $200, but the starting credit line starts at $200. So, if you are deemed fairly safe, you may be required to only make a $49 deposit for a $200 credit line. This is a great advantage, as it doesn’t force you to lock in as much money in collateral. Any additional deposit you make over your required minimum translates into a higher credit line, up to $3000. Annual fee: $29

In deciding how much to put down as a deposit, consider your reason for getting a secured credit card. If you plan on only using your card for a few small charges each month, you may as well make a deposit close to the minimum requirement rather than lock in more of your funds into low- or no-yield accounts. On the other hand, if you see this as a step into embracing a credit card-filled life, it may be worth making a larger deposit so that you can get used to statements and paying off balances that more accurately reflect those you expect to face once you have better access to credit. But whichever you choose, don’t forget to pay off your balance in full so that you don’t erase the benefits of having a secured credit card with the ding of a default on your credit history.

And once you’ve proven your creditworthiness with your secured card for a year or so, start looking for unsecured credit cards. Yes, you too can eventually have one of those cards that doesn’t require locking in money upfront and earns rewards!

Getting the Most from Your Amazon Purchases

If you are America’s largest online retailer, you don’t have to offer coupons or cash back deals to get people to buy from your web store. But if you are an Amazon customer, there are still ways to maximize the savings you get when making purchases on Amazon.com.

First, there’s Amazon Prime, which, for $79 offers 2-day shipping for an entire year on “millions of items” sold on Amazon, and, in my experience, almost all items shipped by Amazon itself. Students can get one year of Amazon Prime for free, and pay only $39 per year subsequently. If you shop a lot online, or are in the market for some bulky item with a high shipping charge, Amazon Prime may be a good deal.

But to get the most out of your Amazon purchases, look into double-dipping. Since August 2011, Hawaiian Airlines’ eMarket has been giving miles, now downgraded to 1 mile per dollar, for purchases made on Amazon.com. US Airways briefly also offered this deal, but has since pulled it down, making the eMarket currently the only portal worth a visit before an Amazon purchase.

earn miles on Amazon purchases through Hawaiian Airlines’ eMarket portal

To double-dip, take a peek in your wallet. This quarter, from January 1st to March 31st, 2012, Chase Freedom cardholders get 5% cash back on up to $1500 spent on gas and Amazon.com. Unless you spend over $100 on gas every week, the $1500 ceiling should be enough to let you effectively get up to 5% in savings when shopping on Amazon until the end of March.

If you don’t have the Chase Freedom card, the Citi Forward card may do the trick as well. Currently, the Citi Forward card, which gives 5 points per dollar on restaurants, books, music, and movies, seems to categorize purchases made on Amazon.com as “books,” effectively yielding 5% cash back when buying through the online retailer. However, unlike Chase Freedom’s deal, which explicitly includes Amazon.com in its 5% cash back category, Citi Forward does not offer a list of retailers eligible for earning 5 points per dollar. In other words, it’s a very sweet deal right now, but you should keep an eye on your statements since Citi can decide at any time that what you’re buying on Amazon doesn’t really count as a book.

On the other hand, if you’re looking to use points and save on cash when buying on Amazon, check your Discover balance instead. In October 2011, Discover announced a new redemption option for its cash back program: spend it on Amazon. The dollars are spent 1-to-1, but while statement credits and direct deposits can only be redeemed in increments of $50, the “pay with Cashback Bonus” option for Amazon allows Discover cardholders to redeem any amount of cash back on an Amazon purchase, which means you don’t have to wait as long to transform the cash back you earned into real cash. For this, all you have to do is link your Discover and Amazon accounts here.

But whether you use the Chase Freedom or Citi Forward card to earn more points, or Discover to redeem points, don’t forget to go through Hawaiian’s eMarket. Even though Amazon’s prices are often already a good deal, and there aren’t many coupons to be found, double-dipping can still maximize what you get out of your Amazon.com purchase.

Chipping Student Loans Away through Shopping

New Year’s is just around the corner, and it looks like I’ll get to celebrate fulfilling one of my 2011 resolutions: pay off one of my graduate school student loans! In three years, I chipped away a $15,550 student loan balance, which now stands at just over $200. I’ll use some Christmas money to finish it off, and should ring in the New Year with one less student loan to deal with (but 2 smaller ones to go).

Besides making payments on the loan during deferment, I used two shopping tools to help me work on that loan: UPromise and ThankYou points.

I’ve covered the UPromise program before, but to summarize, it’s primarily based on a shopping portal that gives cash back to users. The cash back balance can then be applied against a Sallie Mae student loan account, transferred to a 529 education savings account, or redeemed for cash. The cash back rate is often not as high as that from Discover’s ShopDiscover or Chase’s Ultimate Rewards Mall, but every so often I come across retailers that are not partners with either of these two but are in the UPromise portal.

Not that credit cards don’t help with student loans. Over the last two years, Citi’s ThankYou points program has been vital to erasing my student loan balance. I have the CitiForward credit card, which offers 5 Thank You points per dollar spent on books, movies, music, and, most importantly, restaurants, and 1 point on everything else. These points can then be redeemed for gift cards and cash, but also cheques to pay student loan or mortgage balances! Until September 2011, to get a $100 cheque, you needed 12,700 points, but since then the requirement has dropped to 10,000 points. There was no official announcement about this change, so I don’t know how long it will last – if you’re sitting on any ThankYou points and have a student loan or a mortgage, now might be the best time to redeem them.

Now, 12,500 ThankYou points trade for $125 in Student Loan Rebates. In April, 12,700 points were required for $100.

Admittedly, at 10,000 points for $100, this is the same redemption rate as for, say, a Banana Republic or a Macy’s gift card. However, I’ve found that it’s a lot easier to spend money shopping than it is to put money aside to pay off my student loan more quickly, so I prefer redeeming ThankYou points for student loan payments since it’s a way to force myself to pay down the loan with money that never made it to my hands in the first place. Besides, the redemption rate for student loans and mortgage payments is much better than for cash: $100 in cash costs 16,000 ThankYou points.

To redeem ThankYou points for student loan or mortgage payments, all you have to do is call the ThankYou network (1800-THANKYOU) and give them your lending company’s name. They will then mail you the cheque, which you can send to your lending institution along with a note with any special instructions on how to apply the payment (e.g., post everything to the loan with the highest interest rate or to the one with the smallest balance). For UPromise, even though the payments post automatically, you can also call Sallie Mae to request a change to how any payment is applied.

With less than two weeks of 2011 left, if you are also aiming to making a big chip on your student loan or mortgage balance, now might be a great time to ramp up the online purchases you make through UPromise or to redeem your ThankYou points for loan payments. The fact that now you only need 10,000 ThankYou points for a $100 cheque not only sweetens the deal but may also be the push you need – it’s not clear how long this new rate will stick around.

And if it’s too late for 2011, here’s an easy 2012 resolution for you: set up and remember to use UPromise or the ThankYou network to get rid of your student loans next year. Good luck, and have fun watching your loan balance disappear!

Look Out for Credit Cards that Are “Yours” but Aren’t With You

Recently I got an automated email from Citibank letting me know that my credit card “statement is ready to view.” It was not spam and contained the email security zone, which states my name, the last 5 digits of my account, and since when I’ve had the card. The problem? I don’t have a card with those last 5 digits.

I called Citibank to check whether there was a glitch in their automated system, but the customer service representative (CSR) confirmed that there was in fact a card open in my name with those last 5 digits. Luckily, there were no charges to it, but apparently it had been open for a year now. I asked for him to securely close that account, and, since I already had him on the phone, asked to make sure that there were only 2 cards to my Citibank account – the two cards I actually own. He found those and two more. There were three cards to my name that I never actually had!

None of the three cards had any charges to them, but because I do not actually have any of them their very existence was enough to scare me. The CSR was able to securely close two of them but had to write out a manual close request for the third, so I will call in a couple of weeks to check up on that.

But this is what I’ve learned from this experience:

  • Read your credit card emails. Just because you get them every month doesn’t mean they are always the same. For some reason the card that triggered the notification had been open for a year but I never received any notification about it other than this one. Nonetheless, I opened and read through it because it came to a different email address than the one I use for my credit cards. Had it been sent to my other email, I might’ve never found out about it at all.
  • People worry about the impact that opening too many credit cards or closing a card might have on their credit score, but there’s something a lot worse: open credit cards that you don’t physically have. I am less worried about the ding on my score that the inquirer(s) may have caused by opening the card or the dent I may have made by closing all three cards at once than about the possibility that someone could’ve actually used the cards. I do not understand how the card application happened, and why someone would have a card on my name and not use it for a whole year, but I think I’m lucky. If any of the cards had been charged, my score and I would be in much bigger trouble.
  • Call your credit card company just to check what they have on file. You should definitely do that when you get a strange notification like I did, but I would recommend also calling every year or so just to make sure. Even though my “statement notification” email came from Citibank, I am calling Discover as well to verify that they really only have one card on file for me. You never know what you’ll find out – I only got the notification for one Citibank card, but once I had the representative on the line and asked him to check, he found 2 more.

I was lucky that nothing had been charged to any of the three cards I had never opened, and I hope that you are even luckier than I am and don’t have any fraudulent activity to your name at all. But with credit cards, better safe than sorry is the rule. Even if you think you’re lucky, it’s better to call and check than find out the hard way.

Get a Movie Break with Fandango and Visa

It’s summer time, and I’ve probably watched more movies over the past month than I did all of last year. There’s nothing like a dark, heavily air-conditioned room to make me feel like I am far away from this year’s unbearable East Coast heat. And Fandango’s partnership with Visa makes this much appreciated escape a little cheaper.

With a Visa Signature card (which I have through the amazing British Airways offer that was available two years ago), you can get 2-for-1 tickets through Fandango every Friday until September 30, 2011. All you have to do is buy two tickets through fandango.com/visasignature on a Friday for any movie that same day and one of the tickets will be free of charge. Granted, this offer requires that you actually buy through Fandango, which charges a convenience fee, but I sometimes would rather pay the convenience fee than stand in line while I miss the first few minutes of the movie, or, even worse, have the movie be sold out by the time I get to the movie theatre. Besides, the 2-for-1 deal also applies to the convenience fee; with your Visa Signature card you are only charged the fee for one ticket.

The 2-for-1 deal only works on Fridays, but for all other days, a Visa Signature card also gets you $5 off a purchase of $25 “Fandago Bucks,” the Fandango equivalent of a gift card/ voucher. This discount is only being offered until Sept 30th, but Fandango Bucks never expire, so you can buy the vouchers now and use them whenever you get tickets through Fandango in the future.  Or you can just hold onto them and give them away for Christmas if you run out of gift ideas.

the two offers, stacked up

Now the technical stuff: To find out whether you have a Visa Signature card, just look at your credit card and see if it says “Visa Signature” on it, check out this page showing most of the Signature cards offered by Visa, or enter your card number on the Fandango/ Visa Signature page to verify. The discount only applies if you buy through fandango.com/visasignature and pay with your Visa Signature card. And you can only get one 2-for-1 deal per month with each Visa Signature card you have, but you can buy up to $100 Fandango Bucks (for $80 with the discount) each month.

Summer break might be almost over, but the heat is probably staying for a while longer. If you need a weekend activity that involves being outside for the least time possible but that is also affordable, going to the movies with Fandango/Visa isn’t a bad deal. And considering the insanely high concession stand prices, a 2-for-1 deal on movie tickets or the $5 discount may even free up some cash so you can actually afford popcorn or a snack.

New York + Restaurant Week + AMEX + foursquare = $5 off

If you’re in New York this summer, make sure to check out its Restaurant Week event. What originally started as a week in which higher-end restaurants offer affordable fixed-price deals has been extended in several cities, such as Boston and Philly, into two-week events. But New York has taken it to a new extreme – the city’s 2011 Restaurant Week was scheduled for July 11-24, but has since been extended for another six weeks.  The NYC Restaurant Week Extension runs from July 25th to September 5th (excluding Saturdays and, depending on the restaurant, Sundays as well) with lunch specials for $24.07 and dinner for $35.

And American Express and the social media enterprise foursquare have stepped in to make this summer deal even sweeter. If you are a foursquare member, you can get a $5 credit on your Amex statement when you use your Amex card at a participating restaurant.

To get the credit, you have to register (“sync”) your Amex card to your foursquare account, and “check-in” at a participating restaurant during the Restaurant Week Extension period. When you do so, you will automatically get an offer on your phone. After accepting the offer (“Load to Card”), if you spend $24 or more – which you probably will, considering that the lunch deal is $24.07 and dinner is more expensive anyway – and pay with your Amex card, you should get a $5 credit on your credit card statement within 5 business days.

If you don’t have a foursquare account, you can download the program onto your phone for free. Note, however, that Prepaid and Corporate Amex cards and payments using Amex’s ExpressPay feature are not eligible for this offer. And if you have multiple Amex cards, you can only have one “synched” with your foursquare account at a time. Also, you can only earn one of these $5 statement credits per participating restaurant, though there’s no limit to how many credits you can earn if you go to a different restaurant each time. Almost all restaurants in participating in the Restaurant Week Extension are part of the Amex/foursquare statement credit offer, but for a list, click here.

If are in New York before Labor Day, be sure to check their Restaurant Week Extension offer. The list of participating restaurants may be a good place to start if you’re just looking for a place to eat. And even if you already have your dining plans set, you never know – you could find out that the restaurant you are visiting just happens to be participating as well. Then don’t forget to check-in and use your Amex card to get $5 back.

Discover More and Chase Freedom: 5% cash back is great and two ways to get it is even better

I am a huge fan of Discover’s credit card, and I am certainly not alone. Discover has ranked very well in several customer satisfaction surveys in recent years, receiving an award for best call center in the Credit Card Industry in 2010, and coming out on top in various areas directly related to consumers, including ease of online application and general customer satisfaction. Despite this, however, when I praise the Discover More credit card to friends or family, I often hear the same objection: “but no one takes Discover!”

I am guessing this response was probably the impetus for Chase’s launch of the revamped Chase Freedom card in March of last year. The Discover More card, which offers 5% cash back on purchase categories that rotate every quarter is clearly a good idea. Chase makes it even better by trading in the customer service but offering a card that is accepted almost everywhere.

If you are in the market for a credit card with a permanent place in your wallet, both of these cards are worth considering.  Although eligible purchase categories rotate quarterly, 5% cash back on a credit card is an amazing deal right now, especially when the cards come without an annual fee.

Notably, the rotating calendar for which you can earn 5% cash back is not identical between the two cards, so that owning one of the cards does not necessarily mean there’s no point to owning the other. Here are 5% cash back categories for 2010 Chase and Discover side by side:

Importantly, both of the cards cap the 5% cash back you can earn each quarter. Discover’s varies by quarter, such as $800 spent on the categories in the first quarter (effectively $40 cash back) and $300 in July –September ($15 cash back). The Chase Freedom card, on the other hand, caps the 5% cash back to $1500 spent ($75 cash back) on eligible categories each quarter. So if you are a big spender on the cash back credit card, the Chase Freedom card is probably a better option for you. But if you’re a big big spender, getting both cards is even better since you can charge purchases in the categories that overlap between the two cards to the Chase Freedom card, and then charge purchases in the other eligible categories to the respective card.

Excepting the 5% cash back categories and purchases made through the credit card portal, the Discover More card offers a standard .25% cash back on the first $3000 spent each year, and 1% thereafter. The Chase Freedom card is a step above, offering 1% cash back on every purchase not earning 5%. Nonetheless, you may be able to find cards that offer more value than 1% cash back (such as an airline credit card), making these two cards really good secondary cards, used mainly for purchases eligible for the 5% cash back. Besides, neither of the two cards has an annual fee, so you don’t have to reach any spend threshold to make owning either of the cards “worth it”.

Even though Discover’s card came out first, the Chase Freedom card is coming out ahead for now. Discover has the better customer service, but Chase uses the Visa network and is therefore accepted in many more places. Which card offers the better set of rotating categories will depend on your lifestyle, but Chase’s higher cap on purchases for which you can earn 5% cash back continues to push the Chase Freedom card ahead. And Chase’s current offering of $100 as a sign-up bonus only makes the deal sweeter.

If you are going to get only one of the two cards and are not one of those unlucky people who have to use customer service frequently, the Chase Freedom will probably be the one for you. But given the slight difference in 5% cash back categories between the two cards and the lack of annual fees on both, there may also be no harm in letting the Discover More share in your wallet real estate. If you need a nudge, try calling the Discover call center to sign up over the phone and you will see the difference.

The MarketPlace is Not Unique, but Isn’t Bad Either

MasterCard has been heavily advertising its new MarketPlace online portal, and it in fact offers some valuable deals.

When it comes to online shopping, portals for discounts, cash, points, or miles already abound.  These are websites that, if you visit an online store through one of their links rather than by typing the store’s name directly, you can get a credit towards your account with the portal.  Even before the MasterCard MarketPlace, there were already many around, including Borders Rewards Perks, Fatwallet, ShopDiscover, Bank of America’s Add It Up, Amtrak’s Points for Shopping, and AAdvantage eShopping, to name just a few.  But one thing the portals have in common is that they all require payment by credit card at the online store, and the portal owners are paid a commission on the purchase their facilitated.  As a credit card company, MasterCard has launched MarketPlace as a way to cut out the middle-man and get a cut not only for the usage of its credit card, but also for the referral through its portal. Continue reading